Air on the G String (Suite No. 3, BWV 1068) J. S. Bach, original instruments

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The second movement, Aria, from Bach’s orchestral suite in D Major, BWV 1068, performed on original instruments from the time of Bach by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. You can purchase our recording of this track on the “Evening with Bach” CD on iTunes, Amazon and Magnatune
http://goo.gl/WHXW5Y
Voices of Music FAQ
Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
A. Donate here: https://voicesofmusic.org/donate.html and we will make more
videos like this one 🙂 These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
A. You can visit our website, https://www.voicesofmusic.org/ Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list https://www.voicesofmusic.org/
Q. Where can I buy CDs?
A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki: https://www.voicesofmusic.org/cds.html
Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
Q. Why are there no conductors?
A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both 🙂
Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See https://goo.gl/pVBNAC
Voices of Music
Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors
The musicians and their instruments
Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754
Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Timothy Johnson, Indiana, 1999 (after Stradivarius)
Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, 1660
Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791
Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680
William Skeen, five string baroque cello, Anonymous, Italy, c1680
Farley Pearce, violone by George Steppani, Manchester, 1985,
after Amati, 1560
David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012
after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610
Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde, Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century
northern German instruments
#Bach #AirontheGString

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